Census API: Datasets in /data/2010/acs/acs1 and its descendants
TitleDescriptionVintageDataset NameDataset TypeGeography ListVariable ListGroup ListExamplesDeveloper DocumentationAPI Base URL
7 datasets
ACS 1-Year Detailed TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1 and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 2012 data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2010acsacs1Aggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1
ACS 1-Year Comparison ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. Much of the ACS data provided on the Census Bureau's Web site are available separately by age group, race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Summary files, Subject tables, Data profiles, and Comparison profiles are available for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Comparison profiles are similar to data profiles but also include comparisons with past-year data. The current year data are compared with each of the last four years of data and include statistical significance testing. There are over 1,000 variables in this dataset.2010acsacs1cprofileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/cprofile
ACS 1-Year Data ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1 and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The data profiles provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2010acsacs1profileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/profile
2010 American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates - Public Use Microdata SampleThe American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) contains a sample of responses to the ACS. The ACS PUMS dataset includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status).Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. ACS PUMS data are available at the nation, state, and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition each state into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. ACS PUMS files for an individual year, such as 2020, contain data on approximately one percent of the United States population2010acsacs1pumsMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/pums
2010 American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates - Puerto Rico Public Use Microdata SampleThe Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) for Puerto Rico (PR) contains a sample of responses to the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS). The PRCS is similar to, but separate from, the American Community Survey (ACS). The PRCS collects data about the population and housing units in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico data is not included in the national PUMS files. It is published as a state equivalent file and has a State FIPS code of "72". The file includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status). Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. Data are available at the state and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition Puerto Rico into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. The Puerto Rico PUMS file for an individual year, such as 2020, contain data on approximately one percent of the Puerto Rico population.2010acsacs1pumsprMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/pumspr
American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates: Selected Population Profiles 1-YearSelected Population Profiles provide broad social, economic, and housing profiles for a large number of race, ethnic, ancestry, and country/region of birth groups. The data are presented as population counts for the total population and various subgroups and percentages.2010acsacs1sppAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/spp
ACS 1-Year Subject TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. Summary file, Subject tables, Data profiles, and Comparison profiles are available for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Subject tables provide an overview of the estimates available in a particular topic. The data are presented as population counts and percentages. There are over 66,000 variables in this dataset.2010acsacs1subjectAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2010/acs/acs1/subject