Census API: Datasets in /data/2015 and its descendants
TitleDescriptionVintageDataset NameDataset TypeGeography ListVariable ListGroup ListExamplesDeveloper DocumentationAPI Base URL
38 datasets
ACS 1-Year Detailed TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1 and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 2012 data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2015acsacs1Aggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1
ACS 1-Year Comparison ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. Much of the ACS data provided on the Census Bureau's Web site are available separately by age group, race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Summary files, Subject tables, Data profiles, and Comparison profiles are available for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Comparison profiles are similar to data profiles but also include comparisons with past-year data. The current year data are compared with each of the last four years of data and include statistical significance testing. There are over 1,000 variables in this dataset.2015acsacs1cprofileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/cprofile
ACS 1-Year Data ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a uswide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1 and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The data profiles provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the us, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the us, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2015acsacs1profileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/profile
2015 American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates - Public Use Microdata SampleThe American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) contains a sample of responses to the ACS. The ACS PUMS dataset includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status).Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. ACS PUMS data are available at the nation, state, and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition each state into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. ACS PUMS files for an individual year, such as 2020, contain data on approximately one percent of the United States population2015acsacs1pumsMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/pums
2015 American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates - Puerto Rico Public Use Microdata SampleThe Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) for Puerto Rico (PR) contains a sample of responses to the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS). The PRCS is similar to, but separate from, the American Community Survey (ACS). The PRCS collects data about the population and housing units in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico data is not included in the national PUMS files. It is published as a state equivalent file and has a State FIPS code of "72". The file includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status). Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. Data are available at the state and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition Puerto Rico into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. The Puerto Rico PUMS file for an individual year, such as 2020, contain data on approximately one percent of the Puerto Rico population.2015acsacs1pumsprMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/pumspr
American Community Survey: 1-Year Estimates: Selected Population Profiles 1-YearSelected Population Profiles provide broad social, economic, and housing profiles for a large number of race, ethnic, ancestry, and country/region of birth groups. The data are presented as population counts for the total population and various subgroups and percentages.2015acsacs1sppAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/spp
ACS 1-Year Subject TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. Much of the ACS data provided on the Census Bureau's Web site are available separately by age group, race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Summary files, Subject tables, Data profiles, and Comparison profiles are available for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Subject tables provide an overview of the estimates available in a particular topic. The data are presented as population counts and percentages. There are over 16,000 variables in this dataset.2015acsacs1subjectAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs1/subject
ACS 5-Year Detailed TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. Summary files include the following geographies: nation, all states (including DC and Puerto Rico), all metropolitan areas, all congressional districts (116th Congress), all counties, all places, and all tracts and block groups. Summary files contain the most detailed cross-tabulations, many of which are published down to block groups. The data are population and housing counts. There are over 64,000 variables in this dataset.2015acsacs5Aggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5
ACS 5-Year AIAN Detailed TablesThe American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) tables are released every five years. They are available for selected tribal populations, with more detailed tribal categories compared to those in the Selected Population Tables.2015acsacs5aianAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/aian
American Community Survey: 5-Year Estimates: American Indian and Alaska Native Data Profiles 5-YearThe American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) tables are released every five years. They are available for selected tribal populations, with more detailed tribal categories compared to those in the Selected Population Tables.2015acsacs5aianprofileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/aianprofile
ACS 5-Year Comparison ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. The Comparison Profiles include the following geographies: nation, all states (including DC and Puerto Rico), all metropolitan areas, all congressional districts, all counties, all places and all tracts. Comparison Profiles contain broad social, economic, housing, and demographic information. The data are presented as both counts and percentages. There are over 2,400 variables in this dataset. 2015acsacs5cprofileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/cprofile
ACS 5-Year Data ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, housing, and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population. The ACS 5-year data profiles include the following geographies: nation, all states (including DC and Puerto Rico), all metropolitan areas, all congressional districts, all counties, all places and all tracts. The Data profiles contain broad social, economic, housing, and demographic information. The data are presented as both counts and percentages. There are over 2,400 variables in this dataset.2015acsacs5profileAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/profile
2011-2015 American Community Survey: 5-Year Estimates - Public Use Microdata SampleThe American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) contains a sample of responses to the ACS. The ACS PUMS dataset includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status).Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. ACS PUMS data are available at the nation, state, and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition each state into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. ACS PUMS files for an individual year, such as 2019, contain data on approximately one percent of the United States population.2015acsacs5pumsMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/pums
2011-2015 American Community Survey: 5-Year Estimates - Puerto Rico Public Use Microdata SampleThe Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) for Puerto Rico (PR) contains a sample of responses to the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS). The PRCS is similar to, but separate from, the American Community Survey (ACS). The PRCS collects data about the population and housing units in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico data is not included in the national PUMS files. It is published as a state equivalent file and has a State FIPS code of “72”. The file includes variables for nearly every question on the survey, as well as many new variables that were derived after the fact from multiple survey responses (such as poverty status). Each record in the file represents a single person, or, in the household-level dataset, a single housing unit. In the person-level file, individuals are organized into households, making possible the study of people within the contexts of their families and other household members. Individuals living in Group Quarters, such as nursing facilities or college facilities, are also included on the person file. Data are available at the state and Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) levels. PUMAs are special non-overlapping areas that partition Puerto Rico into contiguous geographic units containing roughly 100,000 people each. The Puerto Rico PUMS file for an individual year, such as 2019, contain data on approximately one percent of the Puerto Rico population.2015acsacs5pumsprMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/pumspr
American Community Survey: 5-Year Estimates: Selected Population Detailed Tables 5-YearThe Selected Population Tables (SPT) are released every five years. They are available for selected race, Hispanic origin, tribal, and ancestry populations.2015acsacs5sptAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/spt
ACS 5-Year Subject TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. The subject tables include the following geographies: nation, all states (including DC and Puerto Rico), all metropolitan areas, all congressional districts, all counties, all places and all tracts. Subject tables provide an overview of the estimates available in a particular topic. The data are presented as both counts and percentages. There are over 66,000 variables in this dataset.2015acsacs5subjectAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acs5/subject
ACS 1-Year Supplemental EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1 and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2015acsacsseAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/acsse
2011-2015 American Community Survey: Migration FlowsMigration flows are derived from the relationship between the location of current residence in the American Community Survey (ACS) sample and the responses given to the migration question "Where did you live 1 year ago?". There are flow statistics (moved in, moved out, and net moved) between county or minor civil division (MCD) of residence and county, MCD, or world region of residence 1 year ago. Estimates for MCDs are only available for the 12 strong-MCD states, where the MCDs have the same government functions as incorporated places. Migration flows between metropolitan statistical areas are available starting with the 2009-2013 5-year ACS dataset. Flow statistics are available by three or four variables for each dataset starting with the 2006-2010 5-year ACS datasets. The variables change for each dataset and do not repeat in overlapping datasets. In addition to the flow estimates, there are supplemental statistics files that contain migration/geographical mobility estimates (e.g., nonmovers, moved to a different state, moved from abroad) for each county, MCD, or metro area.2015acsflowsAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs/flows
2015 American Community Survey 1-Year Data Profile 115th Congressional DistrictThe American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. The ACS covers a broad range of topics about social, economic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the U.S. population. The 115th Congressional District Data Profiles are available for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico (at large). Data profiles contain broad social, economic, housing, and demographic information. The data are presented as population counts for over 1,000 distinct variables.2015acs1cd115Aggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/acs1/cd115
Annual Economic Surveys: Survey of Business Owners: Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs Company SummaryComponent Summary Data for Survey of Business Owners2015asecsaAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/ase/csa
Annual Economic Surveys: Survey of Business Owners: Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs Characteristics of BusinessesGender, Ethnicity, Race and Veteran Status code2015asecscbAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/ase/cscb
Annual Economic Surveys: Survey of Business Owners: Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs Characteristics of Business OwnersGender, Ethnicity, Race, Veteran Status and Years in Business code2015asecscboAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/ase/cscbo
2015 County Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides sub-national economic data by industry. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. This data is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas, analyzing economic changes over time, and as a benchmark for other statistical series, surveys, and databases between economic censuses. Businesses use the data for analyzing market potential, measuring the effectiveness of sales and advertising programs, setting sales quotas, and developing budgets. Government agencies use the data for administration and planning.2015cbpAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/cbp
Feb 2015 Current Population Survey: Arts Benchmarking Survey SupplementABS collects information about individual attendance and involvement in the arts and cultural activity.2015cpsartsfebMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/cps/arts/feb
Mar 2015 Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (March) SupplementThe Annual Social and Economic Supplement or March CPS supplement is the primary source of detailed information on income and work experience in the United States. Numerous publications based on this survey are issued each year by the Bureaus of Labor Statistics and Census. A public-use microdata file is available for private researchers, who also produce many academic and policy-related documents based on these data.The Annual Social and Economic Supplement is used to generate the annual Population Profile of the United States, reports on geographical mobility and educational attainment, and detailed analysis of money income and poverty status. The labor force and work experience data from this survey are used to profile the U.S. labor market and to make employment projections.To allow for the same type of in-depth analysis of hispanics, additional hispanic sample units are added to the basic CPS sample in March each year. Additional weighting is also performed so that estimates can be made for households and families, in addition to persons.2015cpsasecmarMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/cps/asec/mar
Dec 2015 Current Population Survey: Food Security SupplementProvides data that will measure hunger and food security. It will provide data on food expenditure, access to food, and food quality and safety.2015cpsfoodsecdecMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/cps/foodsec/dec
Aug 2015 Current Population Survey: Veterans SupplementProvides data for veterans of the United States on Vietnam-theater and Persian Gulf-theater status, service-connected income, effect of a service-connected disability on current labor force participation and participation in veterans’ programs.2015cpsvetsaugMicrodatageographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/cps/vets/aug
2015 International Trade: Historical Imports and ExportsThis international trade file provides the annual dollar value of U.S. exports and imports of goods for all U.S. trade partners. It also provides the annual dollar value of U.S. exports and imports of manufactured goods for all U.S. trade partners. You can find this data and more by going to usatrade.census.gov. If you have any questions regarding U.S. international trade data, please call us at 1(800)549-0595 option #4 or email us at eid.international.trade.data@census.gov.2015intltradeimp_expAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/intltrade/imp_exp
2015 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax, and have receipts of $1,000 or more ($1 or more for the Construction sector). The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Data are published by legal form of organization (U.S. and state only) and receipts-size class of establishments (U.S. level only).2015nonempAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/nonemp
2015 Census Planning Database: Block GroupThe PDB is a database of U.S. housing, demographic, socioeconomic and operational statistics based on select 2010 Decennial Census and select 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates. Data are provided at the census block group level of geography. These data can be used for many purposes, including survey field operations planning.2015pdbblockgroupAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pdb/blockgroup
2015 Census Planning Database: Tract LevelThe PDB is a database of U.S. housing, demographic, socioeconomic and operational statistics based on select 2010 Decennial Census and select 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates. Data are provided at the census tract level of geography. These data can be used for many purposes, including survey field operations planning.2015pdbtractAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pdb/tract
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: Characteristics by Single Year of AgeAnnual Resident Population Estimates by Single Year of Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // The contents of this file are released on a rolling basis from December through June. // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race-in-combination groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2015pepcharageAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/charage
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: Demographic Characteristics Estimates by Age GroupsAnnual Resident Population Estimates by Age Group, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // The contents of this file are released on a rolling basis from December through June. // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race-in-combination groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see https://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see https://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: https://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2015pepcharagegroupsAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/charagegroups
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: Components of Change EstimatesAnnual Resident Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for United States, States, Counties, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // The contents of this file are released on a rolling basis from December through March. // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at https://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration in the United States includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program.// For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see https://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: https://www.census.gov/popest/index.html2015pepcomponentsAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/components
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: Housing Unit Estimates for US, States, and CountiesAnnual Housing Unit Estimates for the United States, States, and Counties // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 housing units due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. For the housing unit estimates methodology statement, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html.// Each year, the Census Bureau's Population and Housing Unit Estimates Program utilizes current data on new residential construction, placements of manufactured housing, and housing unit loss to calculate change in the housing stock since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of housing unit estimates.. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population and Housing Unit Estimates Program provides additional information including population estimates, historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2015pephousingAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/housing
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: National Monthly Population EstimatesMonthly Population Estimates by Universe, Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: April 1, 2010 to December 1, 2016 // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // The contents of this file are released on a rolling basis from December through June. // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race-in-combination groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see https://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // Persons on active duty in the Armed Forces were not enumerated in the 2010 Census. Therefore, variables for the 2010 Census civilian, civilian noninstitutionalized, and resident population plus Armed Forces overseas populations cannot be derived and are not available on these files. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see https://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: https://www.census.gov/popest/index.html2015pepnatmonthlyAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/natmonthly
Vintage 2015 Population Estimates: Population EstimatesAnnual Population Estimates for United States, States, Counties, and Subcounty Places, and for Puerto Rico and Its Municipios: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015// Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // The contents of this file are released on a rolling basis from December through May. // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // Persons on active duty in the Armed Forces were not enumerated in the 2010 Census. Therefore, variables for the 2010 Census civilian, civilian noninstitutionalized, and resident population plus Armed Forces overseas populations cannot be derived and are not available on these files. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see https://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2015) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: https://www.census.gov/popest/index.html2015peppopulationAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/pep/population
2015 County Business Patterns - Zip Code Business Patterns: ZIP Code Business Patterns by Industry and Employment Size of EstablishmentZIP Code Business Patterns (ZBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by ZIP Code. This table includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll for All Industries (NAICS 00) by 5-digit ZIP Code.2015zbpAggregategeographiesvariablesgroupsexamplesdocumentationhttps://api.census.gov/data/2015/zbp